The outlook for the Manhattan real estate market might be cloudy, but a veritable rainbow has appeared on its far western edge. It stretches from Washington Street in the Meatpacking District all the way up 10th Avenue to 20th Street in Chelsea. This sign of better times has come in the form of the opening of the High Line, the long-awaited conversion of a section of abandoned elevated train track into a public park.

“The High Line is a wonderful antidote to the pessimism in the market,” says Jared Della Valle, developer and architect of 459 W. 18th St., which has nine of its 11 condos in contract at an average of $1,300 per square foot.

The outlook for the Manhattan real estate market might be cloudy, but a veritable rainbow has appeared on its far western edge. It stretches from Washington Street in the Meatpacking District all the way up 10th Avenue to 20th Street in Chelsea. This sign of better times has come in the form of the opening of the High Line, the long-awaited conversion of a section of abandoned elevated train track into a public park.

“The High Line is a wonderful antidote to the pessimism in the market,” says Jared Della Valle, developer and architect of 459 W. 18th St., which has nine of its 11 condos in contract at an average of $1,300 per square foot.

Read the full article by Katherine Dykstra “HIGH LIFE” in the New York Post (July 23, 2009).

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